Wednesday, 20 September 2017

The Bradway Hotel Bradway Sheffield (demolished 2013)

This is from the Sheffield Telegraph dated 2nd May 2013 and reports on the plans that were submitted by Sainsbury's to Sheffield City Council to demolish the public house and erect one of their supermarkets. There was local opposition to the plans from residents but this was ignored and the plans approved.

The public house was demolished with haste and the supermarket erected. It is always a mystery that sites like this are allowed to become derelict with litter and graffiti - surely the owners of the building have a responsibility to ensure that it remains in a safe and secure condition.

  And the reason why it appears on this blog - it was in this very pub that I spent my 18th birthday in - a long long time ago!

Mrs Jones of 150 Hoole Street Walkley Sheffield - April 1907

This is from the Yorkshire Telegraph and Star dated 3rd April 1907

It also appeared in the Daily Mirror two days later.

A rare occurrence in 1907 and one that would have put a major strain on the meagre finances of the family. The King's Bounty which incidentally I had never heard of, approximates to about £335 in today's money. I hope that the family received further contributions to assist them in bringing the triplets up. And it would be fascinating to know what happened to the family in the years to come      




Edwin Millwood Oakes (1813 - 1900) - One of Sheffield's Oldest Manufacturers

I came across this report of a funeral for the late Edwin Millwood Oakes (1813 - 1900) dated 7th June 1900


I was going to find out more about Edwin and post an article to the site. However Edwin and his ancestors feature in the Story of Old Attercliffe (Part 2 ) by G R Vine, a transcription of which appears on Eric Youle's excellent blog.

As I have no wish to replicate the information I have just pasted a brief family tree of the Oakes family

  

Edwin was buried as the report states in Sheffield's General Cemetery on Sat 6th June 1900 - the grave reference is Q1 101

Sarah HANDLEY Spinster, Shrewsbury Hospital age: 71, buried: 21 Nov 1862

Sarah Ann OAKES Wife of Edwin Millewood Oakes, Manufacturer, 46 Wilkinson Street
age: 58, buried: 12 Oct 1870


Mary Charlotte OAKES Spinster, 62 Wilkinson Street age: 45, buried: 26 Dec 1897

Edwin Millord OAKES Gentleman, 62 Wilkinson Street age: 87, buried: 6 Jun 1900.

Friday, 8 September 2017

St Michael and All Angels in Neepsend Sheffield. 1906

On Friday 18th August I posted a blog on the missing war memorial from the long demolished church of St Michael and All Angels in Neepsend Sheffield.

To date I am still no nearer locating its whereabouts but I have found two photographs of the church when it served as the focal point of the local community


The second photograph was taken in 1906 and shows the interior of the church


There is more information on the church on the Sheffield History Forum

Oak Street, Heeley, United Methodist Free Church Sheffield

I came across this photograph of Oak Street Chapel, a chapel I did not know even existed


In 1905, Oak Street, Heeley, United Methodist Free Church formed part of the Sheffield (Hanover) Circuit. It is believed the congregation was established in the early years of the nineteenth century. From 1826 until 1871 when the Oak Street Church opened, the Church met in Gleadless Road. In 1867 there were 56 members, by 1927 this had grown to 450. The church came to be known as Oak Street with Anns road (St Andrews) during the 1930s and 1940s and by 1957, was referred to as St Andrews. The last entry for a marriage is 1947. The register was officially closed in 1950.

Wednesday, 6 September 2017

Known unto God - Death of a Baby Girl - June 1900 Sheffield

Whilst I was researching some family history material I came across this small report in the local press

"June 14th 1900

An inquest was held this morning on the body of a newly born female child, found in the canal at Sheffield yesterday. Mr. W. E. Ryves, surgeon, said the body had been in the water about five days, and he could not form any opinions as to the cause of death. The man who found the body in the canal said it was wrapped in brown paper. Round the child’s neck a piece of window cord had been tied, and attached to the cord were a piece of coal and a coal hammer.
The verdict of the jury was that there was not sufficient evidence to show how the child came to its death or got into the canal."
Whilst I agree with the surgeon as to cause of death - he could not find one, and the jury "there was not sufficient evidence to show how the child came to its death" I would contest the statement about "how the (new-born) child got into the canal"
She was wrapped in brown paper with a cord around her neck and attached to the cord was a piece of coal and a coal hammer. This strongly suggests to me that other parties were involved in the preparation and disposal of the body. It is blindingly self evident but the coroner and the jury chose to ignore this fact. 
No investigation was ever launched which was the norm at the time
As for the baby she was most likely buried in a communal public grave like so many others - a very brief life extinguished at the outset





Friday, 18 August 2017

The Lawson Family of Green Street Sheffield - June 1920

And on the same page that the two unveiling's of the war memorials were reported, there was this report that shows another side of Sheffield after the war

It is from the Sheffield Daily Telegraph dated 28th June 1920


Green Street does not exist anymore - in fact I have been unable to find its location. The report is unequivocal in its description of the filth and sqaulor the family were living in. But what is remarkable is the statement that the head of the household Charles Lawson made in court. He said that this kind of thing, that is "gross child neglect" had been going on for 20 years and blamed his wife for it.

If that is the case and I have no reason to doubt Mr Lawson what were the "lady inspector of nuisances" and the Town Clerk's Department doing in that twenty year period. The report infers that more than one visit was made but it appears no action was taken. A familiar story

And what did Mr Lawson do in that period - nothing according to his statement, it was all his wife's fault. But I do find that difficult to believe! He should have received a far greater sentence as the family was his responsibility and not solely his wife's.

It would be interesting to know what happened to the family. I just hope that the children were not scarred by their childhoods but I think that unlikley    

        

Wickersley War Memorial (Rotherham)

Whilst I was attempting to research the current location of the St Michael's (Neepsend) war memorial (see previous post) I came across this newspaper cutting from the Sheffield Daily Telegraph dated 28th June 1920, In fact(it was adjacent to the St Michael's cutting.

 
But thankfully this memorial is still there and what is more a local historian has posted an excellent article on the servicemen that appear on the memorial.

Neepsend St Michael and All Angels, and Wicker Holy Trinity - War Memorial

At the prompting of a friend, I was asked if I knew anything about the whereabouts of the war memorial that was in the long demolished church of St Michael and All Angels in Neepsend Sheffield.

The excellent Sheffield Soldiers of the First World War site does have a transcription of the names on the memorial that was prepared by the vicar at the time but sadly no photograph



I was able to locate a press cutting from the Sheffield Daily Telegraph dated 28th June 1920 which gives an account of the inauguration of the memorial in the church.


St Michael and All Angels was closed in 1952 and demolished three years later. It is believed that the war memorial was moved to the custodianship of Wicker Holy Trinity..

Wicker Holy Trinity Church still stands at the corner of Johnson Street and Nursery Street but is now The New Testament of God

I contacted the church and asked if they knew anything about the war memorial but sadly they did not.which is not really surprising. According to the National Archives the Wicker Holy Trinity church was merged with Christ Church Pitsmoor Sheffield in 1972.

If anyone can offer any further information on the whereabouts of the memorial then please contact me.








Tuesday, 25 July 2017

The War Dead - 1939 - 1945 War Graves Commission Statement

I came across this article in The Times dated 4th October 1945


I was unaware that requests had been made for the repatriation of the fallen both during and after World War 2. Whilst I recognise the distress and anguish that non-repatriation may cause relatives and friends of the deceased, I think that the principle of "equality of treatment" is paramount The Imperial War Graves Commission were fully justified in re-stating their position. 

Arbourthorne School (Sheffield) Class 3A, circa 1948.

The following is a a class photograph from Arbourthorne school (Sheffiled) with Ivy Hill on it (third from right, back row), The photograph was taken circa 1948.


The back of the photo says: 
Arbourthorne school Class 3A, Teacher Mr Whitham.
Back row L-R: P. Copley, M. Hopcroft, S. Stott, J.Pearson, M. Naylor, J. Marsden, I. Hill, R. Beety, B. Schofield.
Front row: P. Finlay, M. Hopkinson, M. Stimpson, J. Wheatly, S. Thompson. 

If anyone can recognise any of the pupls in the photograph please can you let me know

Saturday, 15 July 2017

A Sheffield Funeral - November 1925

I just cannnot seem to get away from involving myself in Methodist Chapels in Sheffield. The other day I sat down and read through this months edition of Grapvine Magazine and came across this photograph in the excellent column "Immortal Words." The writer Jason Heath uses archive photographs that are in the possession of his family business John Heath & Sons. and places them in a historical context.





Jason identified the location as Carver Street Methodist Chapel - the shop Runwell Cycles was opposite the main entrance. Furthermore Runwell Cycles did not start trading until 1925 which dates the photograph post 1925. Jason points out that double funerals are rare and given the presence of  fireman in full ceremonial dress concluded that the funeral was that of two of their colleagues. His great great uncle Joe officiated at the funeral - he is the man with his back to the camera checking that the coffins are steady and correctly positioned.

I did check first with the British Library Newspaper Archive but could find no instances of death in service for Sheffield firemen in the mid to late 1920's. 


I contacted Jason and referred him to the article. He confirmed that it was his firm John Heath & Sons that were the funeral directors that day. The boys' father Cllr. Melling was Chair of the Sheffield Watch Committee which would explain the presence of the ceremonial guard and the mourners were certainly dressed for a cold day in November.  

A mystery solved but whilst I was verifying the material I came across some more information about the origins and history of Carver Street Methodist Chapel. I think I might be embroiled again at sometime in the future 

Tuesday, 11 July 2017

Wards Pub Guide - Sheffield Best Bitter

I Have just posted a pamphlet to the site that I came across whilst going through some old booklets that I have accumulated over many years.

It is a publicity pamphlet but unlike much of the material that is produced today, the content in this booklet is both interesting and informative.



The maps are in the article. I was going to expand this pamphlet but I discovered this full history of the brewery and the people who made it on this site

I would like to know though the names of the four employees of the brewery who lost their lives in the Sheffield Blitz of December 1940. I have asked the owner of the site if he has any idea who they were but if he doesn't I will have a go at finding them.